Journal: Engineering Heritage Journal (GWK)

PRESENT STATUS AND PROSPECTS OF ROOFTOP FARMING IN KATHMANDU CITY

ABSTRACT

PRESENT STATUS AND PROSPECTS OF ROOFTOP FARMING IN KATHMANDU CITY

Journal: Engineering Heritage Journal (GWK)
Author: Deepak Marasini, Nirmal Basnet, Prakash Bahadur Chand, Dipendra Aidi, Dashrath Saud, Manoj Bahadur Khati

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/gwk.02.2022.31.38

Rooftop farming is the cultivation of different food crops in the roof of buildings which is usually done in the city areas where there is scarcity of open agricultural land. Rooftop farming is the best techniques to promote healthier environment and food in city areas. Among the different problems of rooftop farming; major are heavy rainfall, occurrence of diseases and pest, soil loss, lack of improved practices and poly tunnel. These factors restricted the House Holds (HH) to adopt rooftop farming technology. In this study, the focus was especially given to study the status and feasibility of rooftop farming in Kathmandu city. Specifically, this research tried to understand perception of people towards rooftop farming and to identity the major factors affecting rooftop farming, and its significance during covid-19 pandemic. Chandragiri and Tarakeshwar area of Kathmandu city were purposively selected for the study. Out of sample population 50 rooftop farmers were selected, 36 from Chandragiri and 14 from Tarakeshwar by random sampling technique sample size proportion to the population size. The total respondents were 50, out of which 2% were male and 98% were female having 67.27m² average area for rooftop cultivation. 96% respondents were satisfied from vegetable and fruit rooftop. The major problem was wilting having 2.09 mean weightage on Likert scale. The average total input cost was NRS. 7044. 76% respondents were using organic manure and biological control for diseases and pests. 14% of the respondents were facing input supply problem during Lockdown.
Pages 31-38
Year 2022
Issue 2
Volume 6

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